Program Implementation Playbook - Emeril.org - Emeril.org Program Implementation Playbook - Emeril.org

Program Implementation Playbook

 

The Program Implementation Playbook is your roadmap for how to implement, promote, evaluate and grow Emeril’s Culinary Garden & Teaching Kitchen at your school. Developed in collaboration with other experts, this book is an interactive tool that has been organized into 6 sections to help you easily find information on specific topics.

Select a specific chapter to view or download the entire interactive playbook below.

Introduction

The foundation’s mission, an overview of the program pillars, philosophy, and goals, along with expectations of school partners.

Getting Started

Readiness and development information to support program planning and evaluation, as well as design standards, best practices, and guidelines for the teaching kitchen and culinary garden.

Outreach and Engagement

Messaging for how to communicate your role as a school partner and best practices for our standards for communicating best practices for holding community and fundraising events to promote and support your program.

Instruction

Curriculum overview, details, program standards, learning objectives, scope and sequence, lesson plans, and lesson templates.

Recipes

Listing of recipes written by Emeril, organized by grade, that are referenced in the scope and sequence – and additional recipes by Emeril that educators can use for instruction.

Appendix

Resources to support instruction and program

Download Playbook

View or download the entire interactive playbook below:

Download Playbook

Grade Instructions

Grade K

At the end of Grades K-2, students know where the garden is located, that it is a learning environment, and they understand how to be in the garden in a safe and caring way. They begin to understand that the garden is integrated with and complements the teaching kitchen. Students can describe structure and function of plants, identify edible parts of plants and they understand what plants need to grow.

Students can describe the life cycle of a plant and explain the concepts of soil web and food web. Students understand how seasons, climate, and geography play a role in food production, and they begin to understand that a garden is a natural system that produces food.

Students develop key observational, data collection, and critical thinking skills in support of activities they will conduct in later grades.

  • Locate the garden and recognize that it is a learning environment.
  • Participate in school garden activities with safe and caring behaviors.
  • Demonstrate understanding of what a plant is, recognize plant parts and identify soil.
  • Demonstrate understanding through inquiry and observation about the life cycle of plants, plant parts and soil.
  • Demonstrate understanding of what weather is and name the seasons.
  • Identify living and nonliving things in the garden.
  • Recognize and name what plants and a garden need to thrive
  • Demonstrate understanding of abundance (a lot/more) and scarcity (few/less) in the garden.

Grade 1

At the end of Grades K-2, students know where the garden is located, that it is a learning environment, and they understand how to be in the garden in a safe and caring way. They begin to understand that the garden is integrated with and complements the teaching kitchen. Students can describe structure and function of plants, identify edible parts of plants and they understand what plants need to grow.

Students can describe the life cycle of a plant and explain the concepts of soil web and food web. Students understand how seasons, climate, and geography play a role in food production, and they begin to understand that a garden is a natural system that produces food.

Students develop key observational, data collection, and critical thinking skills in support of activities they will conduct in later grades.

  • Demonstrate knowledge of plant parts and name specific edible parts of plants in the garden.
  • Demonstrate understanding of how seeds transport.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the role a seed plays in the life cycle of a plant.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of what forms a soil web.
  • Demonstrate understanding of living and non-living organisms in the garden.
  • Identify, count, and draw living organisms in the garden.
  • Demonstrate ability to distinguish a variety of similar and different plants, and collaborate to select plants to grow in the garden.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of what plants and gardens need to thrive, and explain how to provide those needs.

Grade 2

At the end of Grades K-2, students know where the garden is located, that it is a learning environment, and they understand how to be in the garden in a safe and caring way. They begin to understand that the garden is integrated with and complements the teaching kitchen. Students can describe structure and function of plants, identify edible parts of plants and they understand what plants need to grow.

Students can describe the life cycle of a plant and explain the concepts of soil web and food web. Students understand how seasons, climate, and geography play a role in food production, and they begin to understand that a garden is a natural system that produces food.

Students develop key observational, data collection, and critical thinking skills in support of activities they will conduct in later grades.

  • Identify elements in a food web.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the role of plants in the food web.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the structure and functions of plant parts, specifically stems and leaves.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of planting seeds, transplanting seedlings and seed saving.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of how soil is made.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of how plant and other matter is broken down.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of beneficial and non-beneficial insects.
  • Demonstrate understanding of how the environment and weather shape the garden and its inhabitants.
  • Begin managing scarcity and abundance in the garden environment.

Grade 3

At the end of Grades 3-5, students understand the structure and function of plant parts and how to propagate plants. They are able to identify components of and build soil. Students are able to define what local means, and they can map local food regions. Students understand the environmental factors that shape food regions. They acquire a foundational understanding of the garden as a natural system. They are able to design, plot and implement elements of a school garden. Students perform these skills with appropriate grade level personal and community life skills that include and/or benefit their families and communities.

  • Demonstrate increased understanding of the structure and function of plant parts, specifically of flowers.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of germination, propagation, and plant growth.
  • Demonstrate ability to design and conduct science experiments in the garden.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of geographic and climate influences on food.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of food systems.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of beneficial insects in the garden.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of pollinators and predators in the garden.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of basic garden design using basic math.

Grade 4

At the end of Grades 3-5, students understand the structure and function of plant parts and how to propagate plants. They are able to identify components of and build soil. Students are able to define what local means, and they can map local food regions. Students understand the environmental factors that shape food regions. They acquire a foundational understanding of the garden as a natural system. They are able to design, plot and implement elements of a school garden. Students perform these skills with appropriate grade level personal and community life skills that include and/or benefit their families and communities.

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the structure and function of plant parts, specifically of seeds and seed parts.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of photosynthesis.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of soil management strategies in the garden.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of how geographic place and climate influence the foods growing in a bioregion.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of how latitude and altitude influence plant growth.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of how to identify, assess, and resolve stress and/or poor health of plants.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of a regional food system.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of urban garden design.

Grade 5

At the end of Grades 3-5, students understand the structure and function of plant parts and how to propagate plants. They are able to identify components of and build soil. Students are able to define what local means, and they can map local food regions. Students understand the environmental factors that shape food regions. They acquire a foundational understanding of the garden as a natural system. They are able to design, plot and implement elements of a school garden. Students perform these skills with appropriate grade level personal and community life skills that include and/or benefit their families and communities.

  • Demonstrate knowledge of genetic traits in plants.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of geographic and geologic factors that shape soil.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of how to make soil for seed germination and garden beds.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the cultural origin of food.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of how plants have migrated around the world.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of seed to plate process.
  • Demonstrate understanding of how food systems are connected to social,
  • economic, political, and environmental systems.

Grade 6

At the end of Grades 6-8, students understand how the culinary garden is complementary to and wholly integrated with the teaching kitchen by growing foods to use in the kitchen. Students understand basic garden maintenance and safety skills, how to build and amend soil, how to build and use compost, the seed-to-plant cycle, and how to harvest plants for food. They perform these skills while applying social and emotional life skills that include and/or benefit their families and communities.

  • Demonstrate knowledge of garden design and installation.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the relationship between weather and seasonality.
  • Demonstrate understanding and proper use of soil amendments.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of various propagation methods.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of basic business skills to plan a garden project.

Grade 7

At the end of Grades 6-8, students understand how the culinary garden is complementary to and wholly integrated with the teaching kitchen by growing foods to use in the kitchen. Students understand basic garden maintenance and safety skills, how to build and amend soil, how to build and use compost, the seed-to-plant cycle, and how to harvest plants for food. They perform these skills while applying social and emotional life skills that include and/or benefit their families and communities.

  • Demonstrate knowledge of microclimates and seasonal planting.
  • Demonstrate increased understanding of basic business skills to create a budget with income and expenses.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of various soils types and soil composition.
  • Demonstrate increased knowledge of photosynthesis.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the relationship between producers and consumers in the garden food system.
  • Evaluate the interdependence of organisms in the garden environment.

Grade 8

At the end of Grades 6-8, students understand how the culinary garden is complementary to and wholly integrated with the teaching kitchen by growing foods to use in the kitchen. Students understand basic garden maintenance and safety skills, how to build and amend soil, how to build and use compost, the seed-to-plant cycle, and how to harvest plants for food. They perform these skills while applying social and emotional life skills that include and/or benefit their families and communities.

  • Demonstrate mastery of garden planning and maintenance, seasonal planting, post-harvest techniques, basic business skills, and plant identification.
  • Demonstrate ability to resolve watering, weeding, harvest, and distribution challenges that exist in a garden.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of and explain the proportional relationship of soil components.
  • Demonstrate understanding of weather, seasonality, and succession planting.
  • Demonstrate ability to analyze differences between locally grown and imported food.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of urban garden design.

Grade K

At the end of Grades K-2, students know where the garden is located, that it is a learning environment, and they understand how to be in the garden in a safe and caring way. They begin to understand that the garden is integrated with and complements the teaching kitchen. Students can describe structure and function of plants, identify edible parts of plants and they understand what plants need to grow. Students can describe the life cycle of a plant and explain the concepts of soil web and food web. Students understand how seasons, climate, and geography play a role in food production, and they begin to understand that a garden is a natural system that produces food. Students develop key observational, data collection, and critical thinking skills in support of activities they will conduct in later grades.

  • Locate the garden and recognize that it is a learning environment.
  • Participate in school garden activities with safe and caring behaviors.
  • Demonstrate understanding of what a plant is, recognize plant parts and identify soil.
  • Demonstrate understanding through inquiry and observation about the life cycle of plants, plant parts and soil.
  • Demonstrate understanding of what weather is and name the seasons.
  • Identify living and nonliving things in the garden.
  • Recognize and name what plants and a garden need to thrive
  • Demonstrate understanding of abundance (a lot/more) and scarcity (few/less) in the garden.

Grade 1

At the end of Grades K-2, students know where the garden is located, that it is a learning environment, and they understand how to be in the garden in a safe and caring way. They begin to understand that the garden is integrated with and complements the teaching kitchen. Students can describe structure and function of plants, identify edible parts of plants and they understand what plants need to grow. Students can describe the life cycle of a plant and explain the concepts of soil web and food web. Students understand how seasons, climate, and geography play a role in food production, and they begin to understand that a garden is a natural system that produces food. Students develop key observational, data collection, and critical thinking skills in support of activities they will conduct in later grades.

  • Demonstrate knowledge of plant parts and name specific edible parts of plants in the garden.
  • Demonstrate understanding of how seeds transport.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the role a seed plays in the life cycle of a plant.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of what forms a soil web.
  • Demonstrate understanding of living and non-living organisms in the garden.
  • Identify, count, and draw living organisms in the garden.
  • Demonstrate ability to distinguish a variety of similar and different plants, and collaborate to select plants to grow in the garden.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of what plants and gardens need to thrive, and explain how to provide those needs.

Grade 2

At the end of Grades K-2, students know where the garden is located, that it is a learning environment, and they understand how to be in the garden in a safe and caring way. They begin to understand that the garden is integrated with and complements the teaching kitchen. Students can describe structure and function of plants, identify edible parts of plants and they understand what plants need to grow. Students can describe the life cycle of a plant and explain the concepts of soil web and food web. Students understand how seasons, climate, and geography play a role in food production, and they begin to understand that a garden is a natural system that produces food. Students develop key observational, data collection, and critical thinking skills in support of activities they will conduct in later grades.

  • Demonstrate knowledge of plant parts and name specific edible parts of plants in the garden.
  • Demonstrate understanding of how seeds transport.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the role a seed plays in the life cycle of a plant.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of what forms a soil web.
  • Demonstrate understanding of living and non-living organisms in the garden.
  • Identify, count, and draw living organisms in the garden.
  • Demonstrate ability to distinguish a variety of similar and different plants, and collaborate to select plants to grow in the garden.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of what plants and gardens need to thrive, and explain how to provide those needs.

Grade 3

At the end of Grades 3-5, students understand the structure and function of plant parts and how to propagate plants. They are able to identify components of and build soil. Students are able to define what local means, and they can map local food regions. Students understand the environmental factors that shape food regions. They acquire a foundational understanding of the garden as a natural system. They are able to design, plot and implement elements of a school garden. Students perform these skills with appropriate grade level personal and community life skills that include and/or benefit their families and communities.

  • Demonstrate increased understanding of the structure and function of plant parts, specifically of flowers.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of germination, propagation, and plant growth.
  • Demonstrate ability to design and conduct science experiments in the garden.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of geographic and climate influences on food.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of food systems.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of beneficial insects in the garden.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of pollinators and predators in the garden.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of basic garden design using basic math.

Grade 4

At the end of Grades 3-5, students understand the structure and function of plant parts and how to propagate plants. They are able to identify components of and build soil. Students are able to define what local means, and they can map local food regions. Students understand the environmental factors that shape food regions. They acquire a foundational understanding of the garden as a natural system. They are able to design, plot and implement elements of a school garden. Students perform these skills with appropriate grade level personal and community life skills that include and/or benefit their families and communities.

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the structure and function of plant parts, specifically of seeds and seed parts.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of photosynthesis.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of soil management strategies in the garden.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of how geographic place and climate influence the foods growing in a bioregion.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of how latitude and altitude influence plant growth.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of how to identify, assess, and resolve stress and/or poor health of plants.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of a regional food system.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of urban garden design.

Grade 5

At the end of Grades 3-5, students understand the structure and function of plant parts and how to propagate plants. They are able to identify components of and build soil. Students are able to define what local means, and they can map local food regions. Students understand the environmental factors that shape food regions. They acquire a foundational understanding of the garden as a natural system. They are able to design, plot and implement elements of a school garden. Students perform these skills with appropriate grade level personal and community life skills that include and/or benefit their families and communities.

  • Demonstrate knowledge of genetic traits in plants.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of geographic and geologic factors that shape soil.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of how to make soil for seed germination and garden beds.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the cultural origin of food.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of how plants have migrated around the world.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of seed to plate process.
  • Demonstrate understanding of how food systems are connected to social,
  • economic, political, and environmental systems.

Grade 6

At the end of Grades 6-8, students understand how the culinary garden is complementary to and wholly integrated with the teaching kitchen by growing foods to use in the kitchen. Students understand basic garden maintenance and safety skills, how to build and amend soil, how to build and use compost, the seed-to-plant cycle, and how to harvest plants for food. They perform these skills while applying social and emotional life skills that include and/or benefit their families and communities.

  • Demonstrate knowledge of garden design and installation.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the relationship between weather and seasonality.
  • Demonstrate understanding and proper use of soil amendments.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of various propagation methods.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of basic business skills to plan a garden project.

Grade 7

At the end of Grades 6-8, students understand how the culinary garden is complementary to and wholly integrated with the teaching kitchen by growing foods to use in the kitchen. Students understand basic garden maintenance and safety skills, how to build and amend soil, how to build and use compost, the seed-to-plant cycle, and how to harvest plants for food. They perform these skills while applying social and emotional life skills that include and/or benefit their families and communities.

  • Demonstrate knowledge of microclimates and seasonal planting.
  • Demonstrate increased understanding of basic business skills to create a budget with income and expenses.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of various soils types and soil composition.
  • Demonstrate increased knowledge of photosynthesis.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the relationship between producers and consumers in the garden food system.
  • Evaluate the interdependence of organisms in the garden environment.

Grade 8

At the end of Grades 6-8, students understand how the culinary garden is complementary to and wholly integrated with the teaching kitchen by growing foods to use in the kitchen. Students understand basic garden maintenance and safety skills, how to build and amend soil, how to build and use compost, the seed-to-plant cycle, and how to harvest plants for food. They perform these skills while applying social and emotional life skills that include and/or benefit their families and communities.

  • Demonstrate mastery of garden planning and maintenance, seasonal planting, post-harvest techniques, basic business skills, and plant identification.
  • Demonstrate ability to resolve watering, weeding, harvest, and distribution challenges that exist in a garden.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of and explain the proportional relationship of soil components.
  • Demonstrate understanding of weather, seasonality, and succession planting.
  • Demonstrate ability to analyze differences between locally grown and imported food.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of urban garden design.